Balancing Your Personal and Professional Lives

Doctors are highly motivated to be effective in their professional life but maintaining a balance with their personal lives is a challenge for all of us. How you maintain this balance will ultimately determine not only your success but also your happiness.  I have noted that occasionally I feel discouraged about various aspects of medical care such as the vast amount of paper work that I must complete in order to care for my patients or the continued decrease in reimbursements that we are all experiencing.  When I meet with my colleagues, I know that many are experiencing the same feelings about their practices.

Tips for Studying for the ABFAS Board Qualification Examinations

Studying for the board qualification exam is no easy task. Like any other comprehensive exam, the massive amount of material combined with the implications of having to pass the exam make for a very stressful situation. There is never any “specific” correct way to study for the exam, but there are definitely things you can do to help increase your chance of passing.

The Road from Student to Physician

            Recently, I had the pleasure of meeting with a group of second and third year students at KSUCPM. We discussed everything from difficult classes and preparing for residency, to fellowships, the places that they dreamed of living and working, and even the idea of taking the leap to open a practice of their own. For some students, these areas were only a matter of how, when and where (or in some cases, wherever the path would take them), but to others, with less room for a free spirit mentality, considering something like a post-residency fellowship, or deciding where to practice was much less “wait and see” and seemingly a lot more complicated.

Outside Reading Before and During Clerkships- Stop Procrastinating and Start Reading

Many students have come to me inquiring on how to come up with a good plan for outside reading before and during clerkships. There is a lot that is required of you during your third and fourth years and finding time to read and build upon your wealth of knowledge is difficult-- but extremely important. Therefore it is essential to use the spare time wisely. 

How to Impress During Externships

The fourth year of podiatry is a very exciting but stressful time.  It’s exciting because you are finally getting out of the classroom and start interacting with patients in clinical settings.  But it’s stressful because you constantly feel like you are being judged because let’s face it, you are.  You are going out on these 4 or 5 week “interviews” and you want to make a good impression. 

OBLITERATION OF THE NAIL BED OF THE GREAT TOE WITHOUT SHORTENING THE TERMINAL PHALANX


F. R. ZADIK, SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND
From the Wharncliffe Hospital, Sheffield

Ingrowing toe nail and onychogryphosis arising from deformity of the nail bed of the
great toe often give rise to much disability, and although many treatments have been used none is entirely satisfactory. Conservative measures such as thinning the nail and cutting a longitudinal groove may control the ingrowing, and repeated filing may suffice for onychogryphosis, but such treatment must be continued indefinitely. Repeated avulsion seldom gives permanent cure, and excision of a wedge from the lateral border causes persistent deformity of the nail. Removal of the whole nail bed together with excision of the distal half of the terminal phalanx is often satisfactory but the cosmetic result is poor; the wife of one of my friends who was so treated described her great toes as “two funny little dumplings.”  Complete excision of the nail bed with mobilisation and suture of the proximal and distal flaps (Nuttall 1941) failed in three cases because tension caused necrosis of the flaps so that the wounds broke down. Moreover excision of the nail bed with skin grafting of the raw
area is uncertain. 

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The Key Role of the Lateral Malleolus in Displaced Fractures of the Ankle*

BY ISADORE G. YABLON, M.D.t, FREDERICK G. HELLER, M.D.t, AND LEROY SHOUSE, M.D.t, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS


From the Boston University Medical Center, Universiti Hospital, Boston


ABSTRACT: The reason why late degenerative arthritis developed in some patients who had sustained displaced bimalleolar fractures of the ankle was investigated. The roentgenograms indicated that incomplete reduction of the lateral malleolus and a residual talar tilt were present. When bimalleolar fractures were created in cadavera the talus could be anatomically repositioned only when the lateral malleolus was accurately reduced. Fifty-three patients with bimalleolar fractures were treated by anatomically fixing the lateral malleolus with a four-hole plate. There was an anatomical reduction of the talus and medial malleolus in each instance and there were no late cases of degenerative arthritis when these patients were followed for from six months to nine years. We concluded that the lateral malleolus is the key to the anatomical reduction of bimalleolar fractures, because the displacement of the talus faithfully followed that of the la lateral malleolus.
 

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The Role of Ankle Arthroscopy on the Surgical Management of Ankle Fractures

FOOT & ANKLE INTERNATIONAL Copyright © 2001 by the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society, Inc.

David B. Thordarson, MD.; Ravinder Bains, MD.; Lane E. Shepherd, M.D. Los Angeles, CA


ABSTRACT Nineteen patients were prospectively randomized for operative treatment of their ankle fracture to be supplemented with or without ankle arthroscopy. All patients had an SER or PER fracture with an intact medial malleolus requiring operative treatment without evidence of intra-articular debris preoperatively. All patients underwent plate fixation of their fibula fracture and had a similar postoperative protocol. Ten patients were randomized to the control group with plate fixation only and nine patients randomized to the plate fixation plus operative arthroscopy. The average follow-up was 21 months. The arthroscopic examination of the study group revealed eight of the nine patients to have articular damage to the dome of the talus. Minimal arthroscopic treatment of these joints was required. All patients healed their fractures. No difference was noted between SF-36 scores or lower extremity scores between the two groups. At short term follow-up, it does not appear that the arthroscopic procedure will impact upon the patient's eventual outcome in this small group of patients.

 

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The Effect of Fibular Malreduction on Contact Pressures in an Ankle Fracture Malunion Model*

BY DAVID B. THORDARSON, M.D.f, SOHEL MOTAMED, B.S4, THOMAS HEDMAN, PH.D.t, EDWARD EBRAMZADEH, PH.D.8, AND SAM BAKSHIAN, M.DJ, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

Investigation performed at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Southern California, Los Angeles


ABSTRACT: Nine fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens were disarticulated through the knee, and the soft tissues, except for the interosseous ligaments and interosseous membrane, were removed to the level of the ankle. The subtalar joint was secured with screws in neutral position (approximately 5 degrees of valgus). Contact pressures in the tibiotalar joint were measured with use of low-grade pressure-sensitive film, which was placed through an anterior capsulotomy. For each measurement, 700 newtons of load was applied to the specimen for one minute. The film imprints were scanned, and the contact pressures were quantitated in nine equal quadrants over the talar dome. A fracture displacement device was secured to the distal end of the fibula; the device allowed for individual or combined displacements consisting of shortening, lateral shift, and external rotation of the fibula. The ankle was maintained in neutral flexion. The ligamentous injury associated with a pronation-lateral rotation fracture of the ankle was simulated by dividing the deep fibers of the deltoid ligament, the anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament, and the interosseous membrane to a point that was an average of fifty-three millimeters proximal to the ankle joint. Baseline contact area and contact pressure in the joint were determined, followed by measurements after two, four, and six millimeters of shortening of the fibula; after two, four, and six millimeters of lateral shift of the fibula; and after 5,10, and 15 degrees of external rotation of the fibula. The three types of displacement were tested individually as well as in combination. 

 

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Changes in Tibiotalar Area of Contact Caused by Lateral Talar Shift


BY PAUL L. RAMSEY, M.D.*, AND WILLIAM HAMILTON, M.D.t, WILMINGTON, DELAWARE
Iro,,i t/U Alfred I. duPont Institute, Wilmington

ABSTRACT: A carbon black transference technique was used to determine the contact area in twenty-three dissected tibiotalar articulations, with the talus in neutral position and displaced one, two, four, and six millimeters laterally. The greatest reduction in contact area occurred during the initial one millimeter of lateral displacement, the average reduction being 42 per cent. With further lateral displacement of the talus the contact area was progressively reduced but the rate of change for each increment of shift was less marked.

 

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ARTHRODESIS OF THE FIRST METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT FOR 1-IALLUX VALGUS, HALLUX RIGIDUS, AND METATARSUS PRIMUS VARUS

BY DUNCAN C. MCKEEVER, M.D., HOUSTON, TEXAS


The multiplicity of procedures devised for the radlical cure of hallux valgus, metatarsus
primus varus, and hallux rigidus, and the failure of any one of them to become generally accepted as the best. procedure for these conditions, would indicate that none of them yields a high percentage of good results. Some of the fascial and tendinous sling procedures
for the correction of metatarsus primus varus are undoubtedly applicable in young pa
tient.s and will produce satisfactory results; however, only the test. of time will determine
whether they  ‘ill prevent the ultimate development or recurrence of the hallux valgus
and its accompanying disability. Correction of varus of the first metatarsal must continue
to be essential in any operation for hallux valgus which hopes to yield a permanent cor
rection. The principle inherent in the McBridlc operation would seem to be the only
anatomically reasonable contribution so far to functional correction of this deformity.  

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INJURIES TO THE TARSOMETATARSAL JOINT INCIDENCE, CLASSIFICATION AND TREATMENT


P. H. HARDCASTLE, R. RESCHAUER, E. KUTSCHA-LISSBERG, W. SCHOFFMANN


From the Department of Accident Surgery, Landeskrankenhaus, Graz, Austria


Injuries to the tarsometatarsal (Lisfranc) joint are not common, and the results of treatment are often unsatisfactory. Since no individual is likely to see many such injuries, we decided to make a retrospective study of patients from five different centres. In this way 119 patients with injuries of the Lisfranc joint have been collected. This paper classifies these injuries and describes their incidence, mechanism of production, methods of treatment, results and complications. Sixty-nine of the patients attended for review: 35 of these had been treated by closed methods, 27 had had an open reduction and seven patients had had no treatment. On the basis of our study we suggest that these injuries should be classified according to the type of injury rather than the nature of the deforming force and that their treatment be based upon this classification. It seems that, whatever the severity of the initial injury, prognosis depends on accurate reduction and its maintenance.

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